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HEADLINES, Health
Thinking of travelling this summer? Know your facts about malaria.

World Malaria Day is observed around the world each April 25 to raise awareness about the impact of this serious, sometimes deadly disease. However, malaria remains an all-year risk when travelling in areas in which the disease can be found.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Arts & Culture, Health
Giving children the responsibility of looking after pets is a good idea, but perhaps stick to dogs and cats?

Tortoises are colourful and cute and are often kept as pets. However, many people do not know that tortoises and other reptiles like snakes and lizards can carry harmful germs that can make people very sick. For this reason, tortoises and other reptiles might not be the best pets for your family, particularly if there are young children, 5 years old and younger or people with weakened immune systems in your home.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Pricking a finger everyday is just part of everyday life for many diabetes patients, but now...

A non-invasive measurement approach could release them from the constant pain of pinpricks. The linchpin is a biosensor engineered by Fraunhofer researchers: A tiny chip combines measurement and digital analysis – and can be radioed to a mobile device.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Patients participate in their own care via Apple iPad: New value-based program launched at UCLA

Hershel D. Sinay, 74, has grappled with ulcerative colitis for years, a debilitating inflammatory condition of the digestive tract that has made it difficult for him to socialise, travel and even get out of bed. However, he is doing much better now, due in part to a new program at the UCLA Centre for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases that is using an Apple iPad to help monitor his care 24/7, writes Rachel Champeau, UCLA.
    Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
New research may show why a commonly used chemical could lead to child obesity.

Young people heavily exposed to a very common industrial chemical known as BPA may have 2.6 times the odds of becoming obese as those with low exposure, new research suggests. The study is based on what researchers called a nationally representative sample of nearly 3,000 US children aged six through 19. Scientists measured urinary levels of the chemical, whose full name is bisphenol A and is commonly found in food packaging, reports JAMA and Archives Journals and World Science staff.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Need for volunteer child psychologists in emergency foster care homes critical.

"The need for volunteer child psychologists and occupational therapists is urgent and on-going," says Eleanor Bester, co-ordinator at Heaven's Nest, an emergency children's foster home situated in Ottery, Cape Town. Heaven's Nest provides a place of safety for children under the age of eight who have been abused, abandoned, neglected or that are affected by HIV & AIDS.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
'Are you sure? Would you like to call a friend? No...? So that is your final position?

Using nothing more than a trick adapted from stage magic, scientists say they have induced volunteers to reverse their stated opinions on moral topics without noticing the inconsistency. The findings, published on 19 September in the research journal PLoS One, expose surprising flexibility in human moral attitudes and could have implications for survey-taking, the investigators say - and survey-taking is sometimes a function of an NGO or other organisation here in SA.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Empathy counts when it comes to doctor-patient relationships.

Patients of doctors who are more empathic have better outcomes and fewer complications, at least where diabetes is concerned, according to a large new study. This article courtesy of Thomas Jefferson University and World Science staff.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
An opportunity to take a fresh look at HIV prevention for all.

South Africa should invest in the female condom if it intends stepping up the fight against HIV/AIDS. The availability of the female condom could empower women to have a say in protecting themselves against the epidemic, writes *Tian Johnson in this article is republished courtesy of SANGONeT.org - http://www.ngopulse.org.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Brainpower... separating humans from other animals.

Researchers have found what they think is the key to understanding why the human brain is larger and more complex than that of other animals, in this article  courtesy of the University of Colorado Denver and World Science staff. The human brain, with its unequalled cognitive capacity, has evolved rapidly and dramatically.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Expressing your emotions can reduce fear, UCLA psychologists report.

Can simply describing your feelings at stressful times make you less afraid and less anxious? A new UCLA psychology study suggests that labelling your emotions at the precise moment you are confronting what you fear can indeed have that effect, writes UCLA's Stuart Wolpert. The research could well be of value to South African institution dealing with people with phobias.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
A plea from the HSF: Act now to save our children.

South Africa’s children are facing a new public health catastrophe if we do not take action on rising levels of cardiovascular disease. This Heart Awareness Month (September), the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa makes a plea to all parents, carers and public health officials – look after our children’s hearts.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Alcohol abuse costs the country greatly.

Trade and Industry Deputy Minister Elizabeth Thabethe urges South Africans to use alcohol responsibly and curb alcohol abuse among children. Speaking at the national launch of the second annual Sobriety Week campaign on Friday, Thabethe described alcohol abuse as a growing crisis.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
New SA anti-malaria drug could be a world-beater.

The development of a single-dose anti-malarial drug by the University of Cape Town (UCT) could help Africa and the world tackle a disease that claims almost a million lives a year, the Minister of Science and Technology Naledi Pandor has said. The new molecule, developed by the UCT's Drug Discovery and Development Centre (H3D), was last month selected by Switzerland's Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) for further development.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Well, maybe not a hike, but more people are walking to better health - a step at a time.

Most know that walking is the most common type of physical activity, but you may not know that walking has increased – in the US, at least – so what about walking more, South Africans? Six in 10 US adults reported walking for at least 10 minutes at one time in the previous week. According to a new CDC Vital Signs report, adults walking this amount rose from 56% to 62% over five years.   Read More...




ALL THE NEWS , Health
Fresh air is good for children, so is outdoors play good for their eyesight as well?

British children who spend more time outdoors are less likely to become shortsighted according to new research from the Children of the 90s study at the University of Bristol. The researchers found that children who spent more time outdoors at age 8-9 were only about half as likely to become shortsighted by the age of 15.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
UCLA study helps caregivers of people with dementia.

Six months ago, researchers at UCLA published a study that showed using a specific type of yoga to engage in a brief, simple daily meditation reduced the stress levels of people who care for those stricken by Alzheimer’s and dementia. Now they know why, writes Mark Wheeler.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
Airports in New York, Los Angeles and Honolulu are judged likeliest to play a significant role in the growth of a pandemic.

Public health crises of the past decade - such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu pandemic that killed about 300,000 people worldwide - have heightened awareness that new viruses or bacteria could spread quickly across the globe, aided by air travel. South Africa, as part of the global community, has extensive air links with the rest of the world. We need to be aware of studies such as the one described below. Article by Denise Brehm, Civil and Environmental Engineering.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
...may solve frustrating hurdle for combined drug therapies.

Cancers are notorious for secreting chemicals that confuse the immune system and thwart biological defences. To counter that effect, some cancer treatments try to neutralise the cancer's chemical arsenal and boost a patient's immune response - though attempts to do both at the same time are rarely successful.   Read More...




HEADLINES, Health
If you do not follow your doctor's orders, you do so at your own risk - and cost.

Patients' non-adherence to prescribed medication costs the US health care system an estimated $290 billion annually and can lead to poor clinical outcomes, increased hospitalisations and higher mortality, writes the UCLA's Enrique Rivero. There is perhaps a lesson for us here in South Africa.
    Read More...



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